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Johnson County Government exists to provide hundreds of high-quality services to its more than 560,000 residents. Some County initiatives are highly-visible and impact residents' lives on a daily basis, including wastewater, stormwater, and roadway improvements along with construction or renovation of public buildings. Others County services happen behind the scenes, while plenty of what we do is highly popular, like library programs, park and recreation activities and fun events.

Resident News

Programming your weather radio

As a part of its severe weather awareness activities, Johnson County's Emergency Management Communication's Department is available to assist residents in programming their weather radios. As the strong storms rolled through the county earlier this week, it's a good reminder to take extra precaution this time of year. Weather radios are especially important since the weather sirens are meant for outdoor notification only. Feel free to take your weather radio to the EMC office on the lower level of the county's Administration Building (111 S. Cherry Street, Olathe) during regular business hours. For more information on ways to become better prepared, check out joco72.org

Latest issue of The Best Times Magazine hits the streets

Look for the new issue of The Best Times, the county’s publication informing and supporting Johnson County’s 60+ adults. This month’s cover story is about preventing falls, the leading cause of fatal injury and the most common cause of nonfatal trauma-related hospital admissions among older adults. Other articles include topics such as the Veterans Treatment Court, improved access to health and human services and preparing for severe weather season. The Best Times Magazine is a printed publication created by Johnson County Government, mailed six times per year to Johnson County residents who are 60 plus.  

The March/April 2017 issue, as well as past issues, can be viewed on The Best Times Magazine page of our website.

Veterans Treatment Court honors first graduate

In January 2016, Johnson County District Court held the first Veterans Treatment Court in the state of Kansas. It’s mission — to identify veterans in the criminal justice system and, when eligible, to place them into treatment and court supervision as an alternative to incarceration. Today Johnson County Veterans Treatment Court honored its first graduate from the program. District Court Judge Timothy P. McCarthy, who spearheaded the effort to bring VTC to the county, will presided over the graduation ceremony Feb. 15 at the Johnson County Courthouse.

VTC offers two alternatives to jail time: a diversion track through the Johnson County District Attorney’s office and a probation track through Johnson County Court Services. Both programs allow eligible veterans to voluntarily participate in a 12- to 18-month program composed of court appearances, drug and alcohol testing, treatment, recovery support meetings and a mentorship program.

VTC aims to help veterans who may be suffering from traumatic brain injuries, depression, substance abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder because of their military service. Any eligible veteran can apply to the VTC program. To be eligible, you must be a Kansas resident and eligible for Veterans Affairs benefits or a resident of the county (for Mental Health Center services). Veterans charged with low-level felony or misdemeanor offenses such as DUIs, drug-related charges or domestic violence charges will be considered for the program.

VTC is a collaboration between Johnson County’s Sheriff’s Office, Mental Health Center, District Court, Veterans Administration and the county’s Justice Information Management System.

In 2008, Judge Robert Russell in Buffalo, New York, began the first docket dedicated to veterans after he saw an increase in the number of veterans appearing on his drug and mental health court dockets. Today, more than 250 treatment courts in 40 states offer services to military veterans. VTC programs in Missouri are available in Jackson and Clay counties and the city of Kansas City.

We want your input!

In case you haven't heard, the Johnson County Library (JCL) in Lenexa — currently known as "Lackman Library" and located at 15345 W 87th St Pkwy — will be closing and reopening at a larger location in the new Lenexa City Center! 

The Lackman Library was identified in JCL's 20-year comprehensive master plan as a location in need of expanded capacity. In 2015, the Board of County Commissioners adopted the county's first mill levy increase in a decade (3.3 mills total), of which .75 mills was dedicated to implementation of JCL's comprehensive master plan. The plan includes building a new location in Western Shawnee, relocating the Lackman branch in Lenexa, modernizing other facilitlies and creating a new Operations Center to increase circulation efficiency and helping fund future improvements in southern Johnson County as population increases occur.

Johnson County Library wants to hear input from residents about what features or services you want included in the new library's design. There's a public input session on Tuesday, Jan. 31 from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Lackman Library so swing by if you can. If you can't make it in person, submit your feedback on JCL's website, jocolibrary.org.

NWS Storm Spotter Training Jan. 30

Johnson County Emergency Management and Communications, together with National Weather Service, will present the 2017 Johnson County Storm Spotter Training Monday, Jan. 30 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Mid-America Nazarene University's Bell Cultural Events Center. This training is open to the public, intended for all ages and there is no cost to attend. Meteorologists from the National Weather Service in Kansas City will discuss severe storms and their hazards, how they form and how you can prepare and stay safe this severe weather season!

If you have questions about this training, please contact Trent Pittman at 913-782.-3038.

Make it to class with RideKC

Today marks the start of the spring semester for students at the University of Kansas and Johnson County Community College. If you don’t have access to a vehicle, consider using RideKC to make it to your classes. Transit riders can find RideKC’s maps and schedules online including routes for service from Lawrence. The K-10 Connector serves as a bridge between Lawrence and Johnson County, connecting students to the KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park. All routes for Johnson County can be found on RideKC’s website.

Top 10 stories of 2016

The year 2016 was an exciting one in Johnson County Government, and there are many more great things to come in 2017. Here's a small sampling of some of the top stories from the year.

  1. Kansas' first Veterans Treatment Court launched in Johnson County in January.
  2. Johnson County Arts & Heritage Center (JCAHC) construction began Jan. 14.
  3. The remodeled Central Resource Library opened Jan. 22 after 280 days of construction.
  4. In February, Text to 9-1-1 became available in JoCo & throughout KC region.
  5. The county launched its inaugural Citizens Academy program in February.
  6. Johnson County Museum's 1950s All-Electric House relocated to JCAHC on April 13.
  7. BOCC approved Tomahawk Creek facility upgrades and expansion on May 5.
  8. Expanded bus service began in Johnson County routes in July.
  9. In July, Johnson County Mental Health Center's co-responder program expanded.
  10. Voters approved funding for new county courthouse and coroner facility.
Appraiser’s Office restarts property imaging project

A property imaging project that began in January 2016, and was put on hold because of foliage issues in June, resumes today countywide.

The Appraiser’s Office has contracted Tyler Technologies Inc. to capture high-resolution, street-level photos of the exterior of every county property. Johnson County officials uses the photos to create land record information used in the appraisal process.

Kansas law requires counties to update property information every six years to maintain accurate data on every parcel in the jurisdiction.

Tyler Technologies field staff will photograph properties from customized white vans that will be clearly marked to indicate staff are conducting an imaging and address verification for the county.

All personnel assigned to this project will have photo ID badges and will take images from public right-of-ways whenever possible.

Imaging crews are expected to be in the area for several months and they will be in constant communication with county officials during the project.

The Appraiser’s Office will post the crew’s schedules online. For more information, visit jocogov.org/appraiser or call 913-715-9000.

New $5 fee to be charged at Motor Vehicle in 2017

Effective January 1, 2017 Johnson County will be charging an additional fee of $5 on title and registration, specialty and personalized plate and update registration transactions at our motor vehicle offices.  County Treasurers are authorized to charge this fee per K.S.A. 8-145d.  Revenue generated from the additional fee will help to reduce the burden of ad valorem tax support needed to fund the motor vehicle operation at its current service level.  In 2015, Johnson County approved charging a $5 fee on in-person registration renewals only.  This latest change in policy expands the fee to additional transaction types. 

2016 Property Tax Statements Due by December 20, 2016

The Johnson County Treasury and Financial Management department has begun mailing 200,694 real estate and 20,874 personal property tax statements to Johnson County taxpayers. The first half real estate and personal property taxes are due on or before Tuesday, December 20, 2016, and the second half taxes are due on or before Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The real estate tax statement contains a comparison section between this year’s and last year’s tax breakdown. If the taxes are paid by the mortgage company, the statement will say “THIS IS NOT A TAX BILL” at the bottom. For those taxpayers that pay their statements directly, there will be a return payment stub at the bottom of the statement

Taxpayers have several convenient options to pay their taxes:

  • Online - Through our website, www.jocogov.org, tax payments may be submitted electronically using our eCheck option for only $1 per transaction, or by credit card (Visa, MasterCard, and Discover) for a 2.4% service fee per transaction.
  • By Mail – Taxpayers can mail a check along with the payment stub to PO Box 2902, Shawnee Mission, KS 66201.
  • In Person - Taxpayers can make a payment at our office location, 111 S. Cherry Street, Suite 1500 in Olathe. Forms of payment accepted at our office include cash, check, Visa, MasterCard, or Discover card (payment by credit/debit card includes an additional 2.4% service fee).

There are many other services on our website that may be helpful this tax season. Taxpayers may view an electronic version of their tax statement and print off tax receipts once their payment has been processed. They may also find important Tax Forms and get many questions answered through our Frequent Questions page.

Upcoming Events

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April 1, 2017 | 9:00 am

Johnson County Healthy Yards Expo

April 5, 2017 | 11:00 am

Outdoor Warning Test

April 21, 2017 | 7:30 am

Johnson County Transit Council

May 3, 2017 | 11:00 am

Outdoor Warning Test

May 19, 2017 | 7:30 am

Johnson County Transit Council